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"Minhwa is an invaluable part of Korea's cultural heritage and conveys the mythology, religion, and views of the Korean people"    - Kee Soon Song, Korean Folk ArtAssociation

SAMA 1st Children's Minhwa Drawing Workshop - Art Minhwa 2021

8 new active SAMA members
 
FOM Monday Morning Lecture, Korean Traditional Folk Painting, Minhwa – Art Minhwa 2021

Special Interview of President of SAMA Ham Minsook - Art Minhwa 2021
 
Workshop with the prominent Minhwa artist Moon Sun Young - Art Minhwa 2019
 
SAMA 2nd group exhibition in Singapore introduction - Art Minhwa 2019
 
SAMA 2nd group exhibition in Singapore review - Art Minhwa 2019

Article from the Korean Embassy in Singapore featuring the exhibition 2019

TimeOut 2019 

Singapore Arts & Gallery Guide 2019
 
SAMA promotes Korean traditional arts in Singapore - Kofice 2019
Singapore Arts & Gallery Guide 2019
TimeOut 2019
Article from the Korean Embassy in Singapore featuring the exhibition 2019
SAMA 2nd group exhibition in Singapore review - Art Minhwa 2019
SAMA 2nd group exhibition in Singapore introduction - Art Minhwa 2019
Workshop with the prominent Minhwa artist Moon Sun Young - Art Minhwa 2019
Special Interview of President of SAMA Kang Yurim - Art Minhwa 2019
Workshop with the Minhwa master Song Chang Soo - Art Minhwa 2018
Singapore Media corp Suria channel Documentary on Immigrants in Singapore- Jalan7 2018
SAMA promotes Korean Traditional Arts - Art Minhwa 2018
Minhwa Exhibition in Singapore - Korea Daily Times 2017 
SAMA promotes Korean traditional arts in Singapore - Kofice 2019
People who paint "Happiness" in Singapore - Overseas Korean Times 2017

SAMA featured on Media

Minhwa represents the artistic expressions of individuals who created paintings to decorate palaces and homes and to celebrate joyful family occasions, such as weddings and sixtieth birthdays.

 

It has been said that the tradition of folk paintings has lasted so long because minhwa “touched the soul of the Korean people.”

 

Because the dates and artists of minhwa were largely unknown, their art was treated as being of little value. However, minhwa is now recognized as a valuable art form and one that represents the life of the Korean people during the Joseon dynasty.

 

 The unknown artisans who created folk art had an optimistic outlook on life. In their agrarian society, they perceived a miraculous order of the universe that they attempted to express.

 They used symbolism to express their feelings of happiness, anger, love, and delight in everyday life.

© SAMA // Singapore Association of Minhwa Art